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Kenneth Loveland

Date of birth: October 31, 1911
Date of death: July 26, 1989

Kenneth Loveland graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Class of 1933. He retired as a U.S. Navy Rear Admiral.

AWARDS AND CITATIONS

Silver Star

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Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Commander Kenneth Loveland, United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the Destroyer U.S.S. HOBSON (DD-464), attached to the TWELFTH Fleet, in action against enemy forces during the amphibious assault on Normandy, France, June 1944, and the bombardment of enemy defenses at Cherbourg, France, 25 June 1944. Maneuvering his ship through heavily mined waters under severe and accurately controlled gunfire from enemy shore batteries to protect vessels of the Western Task Force Area from enemy surface forces and submarines, Commander Loveland drove his ship through heavy gunfire on two occasions to lay a protecting smoke screen inshore of the capital ships and, by splendid ship-handling and smoke laying, saved the heavy ships from possible serious damage or possible loss. His professional skill, courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Commander 12th Fleet: Serial 10567 (October 30, 1944)

Action Date: June 1944

Service: Navy

Rank: Commander

Company: Commanding Officer

Division: U.S.S. Hobson (DD-464)

Legion of Merit

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Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Legion of Merit with Combat "V" to Commander Kenneth Loveland, United States Navy, for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. HOBSON (DD-464), during anti-submarine operations in the Atlantic Area on 13 March 1944. Arriving at the scene of a previous submarine attack and immediately gaining contact with the enemy, Commander Loveland brilliantly directed his ship in cooperation with other units in repeated, vigorous depth charge attacks during which the HOBSON severely damaged the hostile U-boat and forced it to the surface where it was promptly destroyed by the assembled craft. By his courageous leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Commander Loveland contributed materially to the success of this vital engagement. (Commander Loveland is authorized to wear the Combat "V".)

General Orders: Commander in Chief Atlantic: Serial 1523 (April 29, 1944)

Action Date: March 13, 1944

Service: Navy

Rank: Commander

Company: Commanding Officer

Division: U.S.S. Hobson (DD-464)

Navy and Marine Corps Medal

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Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy and Marine Corps Medal to Commander Kenneth Loveland, United States Navy, for heroism and meritorious performance of duty in the face of great danger as Commanding Officer, U.S.S. HOBSON (DD-464) during the attempted rescue and successful towing operation of the mined S.S. JOHNS HOPKINS off Marseilles, France, on 2 October 1944. While the HOBSON was proceeding to sea in the early morning hours from the harbor of Marseilles, distress flaws were observed well inside an unswept area. It was soon established that the liberty ship S.S. JOHNS HOPKINS, with six hundred troops embarked, was in grave danger, having struck an enemy mine. When he was ordered to proceed to the rescue, he quickly and prudently took special precautionary measures to safeguard his ship, and then with courage and dispatch proceeded in darkness into unswept waters in the presence of known enemy mines. Upon arrival on the scene, in the face of gale force winds and with hazard to the ship's company and great risk of damage to his ship, he made repeated landings alongside in an attempt to remove personnel. Although each time forced to back clear as the ships pounded heavily in the extreme weather, he handled his ship with great daring and consummate skill. Only by splendid shiphandling on his part and smart seamanship on the part of his deck force was injury to his ship limited to superficial damage. He remained close board the stricken ship until daylight when safe water was finally reach, the ships having crossed thirteen and one-half miles of unswept water. The presence of the HOBSON within hail of the stricken ship throughout the night did much to encourage the personnel embarked aboard the JOHNS HOPKINS in their perilous situation. During the following twenty-four hours, and until the JOHNS HOPKINS was successfully returned to port with no loss of life or injury to personnel, he continued to perform outstanding service and was of the utmost assistance to the officer in charge of rescue operations. Commander Loveland's ability, judgment, and firm determination in the face of great danger reflects credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

General Orders: Commander Naval Forces Europe: Serial 15000 (December 28, 1945)

Action Date: October 2, 1944

Service: Navy

Rank: Commander

Company: Commanding Officer

Division: U.S.S. Hobson (DD-464)